About your Search

20110301
20110331
SHOW
Today 78
( more )
STATION
CNN 197
FOXNEWS 196
MSNBC 178
CSPAN 130
WMAR (ABC) 104
CSPAN2 100
WJZ (CBS) 98
WBAL (NBC) 94
KGO (ABC) 91
KPIX (CBS) 74
WRC 74
WHUT (Howard University Television) 72
WJLA 66
WTTG 60
WUSA (CBS) 60
KQEH (PBS) 52
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1949
TOPIC
new york 1955
libya 1366
washington 1172
obama 838
gadhafi 778
tripoli 600
tokyo 561
japan 557
nato 520
florida 462
u.n. 420
maryland 414
wisconsin 406
( more )
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,955 (some duplicates have been removed)
news on the bear area at 6:00. we'll see you then. lt by u.s. warplanes intensifies. a defiant gadhafi warns of a crusader war and vows to fight back. crusader war and vows to fight back. tonight, what is the endgame? captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening, everyone. the pentagon tonight says the allied assault on libya's military has inflicted heavy damage on moammar gadhafi's forces and grounded his combat planes. that assault, which we now know is being led by american warplanes, including long-range stealth bombers, has targeted both libya's air defenses and ground troops in an effort to halt gadhafi's attacks on anti-government rebels. but coalition officials insist gadhafi himself is not a target. tonight, as anti-aircraft fire lit up the skies over tripoli, libya's military command order claimed again it wasrding its units to observe is i cease-fire, a claim western forces are skeptical of. we begin tonight with jim miklaszewski. jim? >> reporter: lester, there's only been one full day of american and coalition air strikes against libya, but senior u.s. m
, who warned that u.s. military personnel and u.s. citizens in japan should actually go back to a radius of 80 kilometers around fukushima. japan has said 20 kilometers, so it seems that the u.s. has an assessment that is fairly serious. >> any idea if they are following the french lead, recommending that they leave japan altogether? >> we have not had any word on that from the united states government. i think that would be much further for the u.s. in the sense that the u.s. has so many people in the country, currently 50,000 u.s. troops currently in japan get there is concern. the u.s. government says it is monitoring -- currently in japan. there is concern. the u.s. government says it is monitoring the situation. there is no thought that anyone residing in the u.s. is at risk. >> but with 34 u.s. experts landing on wednesday, joining seven others, all with an american equipment, the u.s. is having to answer questions about whether it even trusts japan completely. >> a slight difference from what we are hearing out of japan and from the united states. i think it is worth pointing out
of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention around the world is also shifting to the economic consequences of the disaster. many economists believe the country is likely to slide into recession. so what will that mean for the rest of the world? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: there's no question the human toll of japan's epic earthquake and tsunam
. right now on "fox news sunday." missile strikes. the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles as coalition forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update on talk with the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen live on "fox news sunday." then two leading senators weigh in on the mix, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works t work contain a nr disaster. we will get the latest from japan and talk with the secretary of energy steven chu. plus, we ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on these issues or following. all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington where we are tracking two major stories. we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and its allies are using military force to protect the antiqaddafi rebels. and in japan, where officials are making progress toward bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that later and talk with the secretary of energy. first, libya, u.s. stealth bombers struck a major libyan airfield. and qaddafi called the raids terr
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
>>> welcome to nhk news world line. the u.s. embassy announced the head of japan affairs at the state department kevin maher has been fired. visiting u.s. assistant secretary of state kurt campbell, in facted him of the move on thursday in their talks on thursday. they say a former deputy chief will assume the post. maher reportedly told some college students in the u.s. last december that okinawans are masters of manipulation and extortion. he was referring to the relocation of a u.s. marines air space station in the southern most prefecture. in the talks with takeaki matsumoto, campbell said maher's comments are unacceptable and contrary to u.s. policy and its respect for the people of okinawa. >>> japan's two major stock exchange operators will explore the possibility of consolidating their businesses. the talks will be aimed at bolstering japan's standing in the world equity market, amid growing pressure for realignment in the industry. if they agree to integrate operations it will have a listing of 4,000 stocks, rivaling the world's leading forces. the two will likel
military targets overnight. a spokesman suggests u.s. combat operations may have peaked. the u.s. role is in the no-fly zone. it's moving from action to patrolling phase today. libyan handlers took journalists to see damage inside gadhafi's compound. that happened earlier today. a possible missile wrecked a four-story building. gadhafi was not the target. >>> defense secretary robert gates arrived in russia today as that country's prime minister turned up the heat. putin ripped the united states for what he called a steady trend of intervention abroad. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition and be a member of the coalition and have a military role in the coalition. >> arab league president is toning down his criticism of the coalition attacks. he met with u.n. secretary moon in cairo today saying he's committed to the u.n. resolution on libya. yesterday, he complained the campaign was too broad and civilians were killed. >>> libya freed four new york times journalists today. the four cro
international airport. the shooting involved a u.s. military shuttle bus. someone got on the bus and started shooting. two are confirmed dead. we believe they're two u.s. soldiers. one person has been taken into custody. again we know two are killed. it is reported that those are two u.s. soldiers. the incident is over, the airport is operating as usual. this is out of frankfurt. as soon as we get more detail, we get to fred out of berlin. >>> the u.s. supreme court is reaffirming the first amendment right to free speech even if it is painful and ugly. in an 8-1 decision, they say a kansas church can push their message outside military funle rals. jeffrey toobin is on the phone with us. jeff, let's start off here, is this a surprise to you the court's decision? because this is a case that everybody's been watching. >> reporter: it's a pain until awful case and the westboro baptist church is an insuggelt religion everywhere. but the decision is not a surprise. these statements in this context, nondisruptive statements about politics, are at the heart of what the first amendment is all about e
>>> on the broadcast tonight, closing in on gadhafi. there's talk of u.s. military options against him. and now for hordes of people, now's the time to get out of there. >>> a collision course in wisconsin with time running out. tonight, is there a deal to end the standoff? >>> america at the crossroads. all week long our reports here on america's changing economy. tonight, are we keeping up in the search for the next big thing? >>> and the winner is -- the good, the bad and the ugly at this year's oscars. and the amazing story behind the man behind the best picture. and the amazing story behind the man behind the best picture. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. the situation in libya is now a lot more serious where the u.s. is concerned. u.s. navy ships are being readied for a number of possible options here including possibly enforcing a no-fly zone. moammar gadhafi spoke again today on two television networks an interview the u.s. immediately called delusional. all this time the forces against him are closing in. we begin t
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
to make the case for u.s. involvement,. this comes as libyan rebels resume their offensive. they advanced 350 miles this weekend and retook two key oil towns. military missions are mostly completed according to u.s. officials. >> we prevented the large-scale slaughter that was beginning to take place and has taken place in some places. >> on one hand they say it's humanitarian and on the other they say gaddafi must go. >> defense secretary gates and secretary of state clinton will be brief congress on the u.s. mission in libya and the cost. the president will speak tonight at 7:00 -- 7:30 on abc 7 news. >>> monday. the crisis at the crippled nuclear power plant may be getting worse. japanese officials say highly radioactive iodine is seeping from the facility. contaminated sea water is being found farther from the plant. they are pumping hundreds of tons of radioactive water. now the plant operators are apologizing for overstating radio -- radiation levels inside the reactors. >>> 32 years ago today the u.s. suffered its worst nuclear crisis, three mile island nuclear plant in pennsylvani
. right now, on fox news sunday. ♪ missile strikes, the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles, as quo litigation forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update from libya, and, talk with a chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, live, only on fox news sunday. then, two leading senators weigh in on the mission, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works to contain a nuclear disaster, what does the crisis there mean for energy policy at home? we'll talk with the secretary of internally, steven chu and we'll ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on the tough issues or following. all, right now on fox news sunday. >> chris: we are trashing two major stories, we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and allies are using military force, to protect the anti-qaddafi rebels. and, in japan, where officials are making progress for bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that, later and talk with the secretary of energy, but, first, libya, allied officials say they hit more than 20 air
are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a fourth night of allied air strikes pounding libya, leader
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
the president's plan. >>> fallout fears. the pentagon considers the mandatory evacuation of all u.s. military personnel threatened by radiation in japan as the first american victim of the tragedy is found. >>> and medical marvel. a texas man gets the first full facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning allied forces are working to expand the no fly zone over libya. overnight tripoli was targeted for the third day in a row and there is growing discord among the allies and here in this country over the u.s. role. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. >> reporter: several days of attacks on libya are having their intended effect according to u.s. officials, even so, more in congress are questioning the president's decisions. anti-aircraft fire erupted in tripoli overnight as moammar gadhafi's forces battled a fresh round of air strikes. u.s. officials say days of attacks on the regi
are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nuclear complex with so much problems in the past couple of days, today, another reactor facing the possibility of a meltdown. they say they are in control of the situation. but the evacuation from the region around the reactors continues and the possibility of poisoning from radioactivity also going forward. dozens are testing positive for that. now to the number. there is one official here, in one region who said yesterday that 10,000 people were missing. now he is saying he feels that 10,000 people are dead in his region alone. that may add to the figure. we traveled today and we notice shortages are a problem. of food, of fuel and power in this village, of everything people need to get by. that is why relief is rushing to this area. tod
assess what the u.s. and the world are doing now, and what comes next. >> ifill: plus, we examine what the unrest in the middle east is doing to gas prices here at home. >> woodruff: then, we have the first of two reports from guatemala. tonight, ray suarez looks at programs aimed at combating a long history of domestic violence. >> suarez: as part of a nationwide effort to improve women's health these workshops are pushing back against a rape culture trying to lower the epidemic levels of violence against women and girls. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks to scott shane of the new york times about the obama administration's decision to resume military trials at the guantanamo bay prison. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and rel
-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations full-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations of american citizens. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wonderi
>>> making news in america this morning. >> president obama gets ready to make his case for the u.s. role in libya. today's speech to the nation comes as libyan rebels go on the offensive. >>> japan rattled by another earthquake as the credibility gap widens in confusing statements about that criminalled nuclear plant. >>> and back here at h final four final four bound. virginia commonwealth gets ready for another wild week after another march madness stunner. >>> good morning. we begin with libya where rebel forces are advancing on the capital tripoli this morning. >> and there's an unconfirmed report they've already taken moammar gadhafi's hometown which is a government stronghold, the rebels are benefitting from they air strikes by the international coalition. >> and tonight, president obama tells the american people why the u.s. thread effort. abc's emily schmidt joins us with more. good morning. >> reporter: peggy and rob good morning to you. this is now day ten of the no-fly zone over libya. president obama plans to address the nation tonight about libya. he's expected to say
>>> making his case. president obama defends the u.s. mission in libya. >> some nations may be able to turn a blind eye to atrocities in other countries. the united states of america is different. >>> discrimination suit. america's biggest retailer on edge as the supreme court takes up one of the biggest workplace lawsuits in history. >>> and caught on tape. a vintage air force plane makes an unexpected water landing. this is the "cbs morning news" an unexpected water landing. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. defending the u.s. military mission in libya. president obama says the operation was necessary to prevent a campaign of killing. this morning rebel forces continue to push west under the cover of allied air support. nato takes command of the operation tomorrow. secretary of state clinton arrived in london last night. this morning she will attend a conference to discuss what comes next in libya. last night the president said u.s. actions in libya stopped a slaughter a
>>> on the broadcast tonight, who's in charge? is the u.s. about to hand over control of the attack on libya? and tonight what may be the next nation to go in that region. >>> changing face. a major milestone tonight for a growing group of americans. >>> asleep in the tower. two jets needing to land in washington can't raise an air traffic controller, and now we know why. >>> and making a difference, for the struggling people of japan. nbc news with americans on a mission to provide critical relief. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. it has turned into a big military effort, bombs and cruise missiles have been raining down on libya, and it could get even bigger and the stakes are high. it's been a mostly u.s. run air campaign thus far, but tonight a change is coming. a hand-over to nato for the supervision of this strike. even though the pentagon warned libya today, quote, we will continue to hit you, the u.s. is anxious to shift some of this to somebody else. and just as there have been new and loud explosions in tripoli this
in the euro after it jumped to a four-month high against the u.s. dollar on thursday. now coming away from that a little bit, but obviously underlying that, underpinning the euro was the central bank president. slightly caught investors offguard when he said interest rates may rise as soon as next month. people had been betting in terms of june or may. the yen at 82.44 to the dollar. >>> investors across asia seem to be focusing pretty much what's going on in the u.s. we've got that better than expected jobs number out. it was a weekly jobs number which is providing a pretty strong indicator, at least that's how it's being seen for the u.s. economy. that rally overnight. and that helped the markets pretty much across the board here in asia. all four of the key markets up by more than 1.4%. there was a weaker yen against the u.s. dollar in japan, that helped the exporters. all in all, hong kong up 1.25%, shanghai 1.3%, and australia with a 1.2% gain. >>> well, if you thought that was impressive, let's have a look at the u.s. markets. and essentially what we're looking at is the best session
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
several homes. no injuries were reported there, th. >>> kewhere the coast.ips are patrolling off u.s.fficials say theibyan air force is nlonger a factor. mewhile, libyan ground forces still trying to retake rebel-held posions are being attacked by alliplaned war.rrl . >> reporter: traces of anti-acrt fire pierce the night sky tripo. the eastern part of thcapital. there's alsoord that clition forceshit have ammar gadhafi's command in ajdabiya. rebels moving up their front line are confident they'll soon be able to te that city. >> this is a matteof time. time only. aftemaybe one day or less than one day, these tanks wil surrender. >> reporter: clition planes so bombegadhafs forces in misrata, to stop them from shling civilians. secretary of state hilry clinton says coladhafi h the power to stop all of this. >> the quickest way for him to end is is to actually serve thliby people by leaving. repeatedly sted gadhafi must go. but the u.n. rolution lls foprection of the byan peoplenot a regime change. that leaves pridt obama to answ some tough estions. house speaker john boehner sen the
the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which is a key city two hours east of tripoli, people are saying that civilians are still being massacre
reactors in japan spooked investor confidence, and stock markets around the world sold off. here in the u.s., the panic- selling swept through wall street, but the major averages rebounded by the close of trading. the dow tumbled 137 points, reversing a loss of nearly 300 points earlier in the session. the nasdaq fell 33, and the s&p was down 15. so what happens now? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the moment the opening bell rang on wall street, fear gripped the stock market. trader art cashin says the disaster in japan prompted many investors to dump their holdings at any price. >> when you can't sell what you want to sell, you sell whatever you can-- sometimes, your grandmother's necklace. you don't like to sell that, but if that's the only thing that gets you money, you have to do that. >> reporter: the dow's decline was serious, but the drop was far worse in japan. the nikkei lost more than 10%. most european markets also fell. the question for investors is what to do now? is the stock market overreacting to the crisis in japan, or does it pose a major threat to global growth? marke
growing concern about the bombing of rebel-held areas by gaddafi's forces, there are voices in the u.s. and europe calling for the rebels to be armed to directly. it sounds simple, but history offers plenty of cautionary tales. in a moment, we will hear whether senator john mccain thinks it is a good idea. >> what i am calling for is a greater access for the libyan opposition forces for weaponry. >> there is no guarantee that by helping these people, you necessarily bring about a more democratic outcome or more desirable outcome. >> the question is, what kind of arms with a supply? whom would supply them? britain session -- britain's special forces may have suffered a setback last week in libya. but the momentum is still building in the west for military intervention of some kind, including perhaps arm the rebels. in libya, repeated bombing by government warplanes around the rebel-held oil town of ras lanuf marks colonel gaddafi's drive in his country. opposition forces are determined, but still lack a clear organization or command structure. the worst violence was reported near tripol
. officials have been scrambling to avoid a meltdown ever since and are now asking the u.s. for help. >> in particular they have asked for additional types of equipment that will help provide water and other types of resources to ensure that the reactors continue to be cooled. >> reporter: fears of a full blown meltdown have spread all the way to tokyo located 150 miles from the plant. officials there have detected low levels of radiation and a shift in winds threatens to push it even further. even without a possible nuclear disaster, japan is facing its worst crisis since world war ii. death toll jumped to more than 2400 confirmed dead, but officials warn that number is likely to top 10,000. and now the country faces an economic crisis, as well. this morning japanese stocks plummeted more than 10%. as far as that radiation cloud, as i said, they have picked up low levels of radiation outside of tokyo, but there is another concern whether it intensifies and the wind shifts, it could head toward that area that was hardest hit by the earthquake and tsunami that followed. >> as we hear
at the wreckage of a u.s. f-15 that crashed today in rebel-held eastern libya, for reasons the u.s. military says were mechanical, not hostile. i will say that again for you. the u.s. says the plane had equipment problems and was not shot down. the two-man crew jekted and the pilot was recovered quickly. the weapons officer was found by rebels and americans reached him. neither badly hurt. >>> back in tripoli, reporters saw the results of a missile landing on a port. >>> we also have remarkable pictures from misrata, a city down the coast that gadhafi forces have bombarded for days. this is amateur video uploaded to youtube yesterday. now, we can't confirm when or where it was shot, but we do know misrata's main hospital reports 77 deaths since sunday. the u.n.-approved campaign to protect libyan civilians began saturday and it's still not clear who will actually end up in charge. arab states don't want to work for nato and u.s. has other campaigns to worry about. nato says it will enforce a libyan arms embarge go the in meantime. let's bring in diana magnay, she's on the "uss keer sauj." nic rep
>>> tonight on "world news," question sell it? president obama tells americans why he is risking u.s. fighters and all those billions of dollars in libya. >>> women versus walmart. the nation's biggest employer heads to a showdown in the nation's top court and the subject is sex discrimination. >>> curing diabetes? could surgery -- look at this woman before and now this woman after. could surgery work for 14 million obese americans with type ii of the disease. >>> and seven years old and sexy? a big company selling push-up bikinis for little girls as a lot of americans are wising up today to say it's time to draw the line. >>> good evening and thank you for joining us this monday. in less than one hour the president will take to the airwaves to try to convince americans that it was the right decision for the u.s. to be part of the allied fight in libya. a third battle front for the united states. with a lot of military force on the line and costing possibly billions. our jake tapper is standing by in the hall where the president is about to arrive at the national defense university i
republican candidate mike huckabee is confused about where the current president grew up. but first, the u.s. is closer to the crisis in libya. tonight two u.s. warships are heading for the waters off libya although for now he says it's not to fight. >> we'll be enter the mediterranean shortly. it will provide us a capability for both emergency evacuations. >> moammar gadhafi is trying as hard as he can to hold onto power. pro-gadhafi troops tried and failed to retake a town neurotripoli currently under rebel control. and one of gadhafi's sons tells cnn the government is trying to talk with the rebels, but the rebel leadership is in chaos. let's start with cnn's international correspondent, ben wedeman, who is in rebel-held city benghazi. the former libyan interior minister says the noose is tightening around gadhafi's neck. tell us where have you gone and what have you seen? >> we headed sort of in the direction of tripoli. what we've seen is that the noose isn't necessarily tightening around gadhafi's neck. it's clear the opposition is in firm control of this part of the country, but if yo
and the u.s. nuclear chief says the water evaporated. if they are exposed they can catch fire, melt, and release large amounts of ridation into the air. we are told crews are still working on a new power line that would restore the electricity there in theory and get the water pumps back up and running. officials say the cold snap is slowing down their effort but not word on when that cable might be connected. in the meantime, 200 courageous plant workers, 180 of them, are jack belling to cool the reactors by hand. they are risking their lives to prevent a catastrophe. a total meltdown is a stunning blow after the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the northeast portion of japan. we got dramatic new video to fox of people trying to save eve other as the monster wave swept through the town. look at this. (speaking japanese). >>shepard: a week later search teams are still digging for the dead. and survivors gather what is last of their belongings. but for many, there is simply nowhere to go. expire towns are wiped off the map and it will take likely years to rebuild. so we will ge
, this time at reactor number 4. martha: the u.s. officials say the next 28-48 hours are critical in stopping and cooling down what's going on inside these reactors. if it doesn't happen, this area could be deadly for many years to come. good morning julian. tell me what the latest is from where you are. >> reporter: i think have much the efforts today to put cold water on the reactors has failed. the helicopters have only marginally put as much water as they wanted to on the reactors. it doesn't seem to be having a regular effect. all hopes rest with the crews trying to link up the electricity line back into the plant that will then allow them to restart the generators which automatically pump cold water onto these heated up reactors and bring temperatures down. all other efforts seem to have failed. the attempt to use fire engines to pump cold water on the reactors has failed. they are look at a single solution now. martha: it sounds like it's up to these people known as the fukushima 50, 180 workers rotating in and out of the plant to limit their own exposure to the radiation. what a coura
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
's talk about that also with retired u.s. army general george jalwan, the nato allied supreme commander. if in fact this is true that the president in recent days, maybe the past week or two, signed a covert action order, a finding, as they call it, to secretly assist the rebels who are fighting gadhafi's forces, what does that say to you? >> first of all, i have no knowledge of whether he signed a finding or not. it may be one of two things, may be an actual sort of action or it could be keep pressure on gadhafi to really feel the heat that he's feeling now with the resignation of his foreign minister and also with what i think is what is happening in london where the international community is very much united in what needs to be done. >> for all practical purposes the coalition, now nato control, they -- they have taken aside in this civil war, they want to help the rebels and see gadhafi go, even though the u.n. security council resolution didn't go that far as we all know. here's the question. if in fact the president signed a secret finding that goes way beyond what the coalition
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,955 (some duplicates have been removed)